ALEXANDER HAHN

electronic media artist

Plein-air ::  Spectacle of Public and Private Joy and Calamity


Sara D. Roosevelt Park - Plein-air  

Date: 07 04 2020

Medium: color pigment ink on polypropylene

Dimensions: 36  x 22.5 inch.  

Edition: 7 + 2AP     


Man standing near a puddle in the synthetic turf soccer field. He is part of a group of artists, many dressed in historic costume to celebrate Independence Day.  They convene regularly in the Park for classes of life figure drawing, strangely oblivious of the other visitors, teens, athletes, local families as well as homeless and drug users.


All the prints in this series are made during the COVID-19 pandemic in NYC, most of them records of chance encounters on my short daily walk to the studio in Chinatown..

I printed on Polypropylene despite the manufacturer's alert that the material was NOT inkjet printable. The ink isn't absorbed and stays wet for a long time. Chromatographic seepage blurs the digital sharp-edge, the imprecision and randomness reflecting our uncertain times.    


Plein-air ::  Spectacle of Public and Private Joy & Calamity


Round Two  

Date: 06 30 2020

Medium: b/w pigment ink on polypropylene

Dimensions: 36  x 22.5 inch.  

Edition: 7 + 2 AP



Young man by the curbside, sitting in a trashed chair, waiting for Round Two to open, a boutique "selling/trading unique t-shirts with character or a memory from the past." 

Plein-air ::  Spectacle of Public and Private Joy & Calamity


Woman with a Shopping Cart  

Date: 09 11 2020

Medium: b/w pigment ink on polypropylene

Dimensions: 36  x 22.5 inch.  

Edition: 7 + 2 AP



At first glance, a woman fixing her sandal, but the shopping cart on the sidewalk, in these times, speaks a different story - homelessness.  

Plein-air ::  Spectacle of Public and Private Joy & Calamity


Specter of Homelessness  

Date: 09 11 2020

Medium: b/w pigment ink on polypropylene

Dimensions: 36  x 22.5 inch.  

Edition: 7 + 2 AP



fortuitous computer generated merger of two candid video stills, embodies the drama of the sorry existence of our society's castaways. 

Since the outbreak of the pandemic, the homeless population has surged in my neighborhood. On my way to work, I walk past their growing encampments. I see images that should not be but they are. And they are deeply engraved into my memory of the present.